Thursday, 13 July 2017

You are loved


The support I have had from friends, family, colleagues and even strangers since my diagnosis has been truly wonderful.  I want to give you a flavour of how kind and thoughtful people have been. 


My husband and son



My husband and son have been amazing.  They have put up with me during some incredibly dark moments.  I do try desperately hard not to get irritated or upset by things but it's a challenge sometimes.  

My husband and son help to keep me sane.  They haven't yet asked for any support from anyone for themselves.  But they know that if they need it, it is available to them, both from other relatives and also many cancer support organisations.

I love them both very much and I honestly don't know what I'd do without them.


My relatives



My relatives (both my immediate and extended family) have been fantastic too.  They have been all so very kind, sent me lovely messages of support, lit candles, sent flowers, said prayers and have made me laugh endlessly.  They are truly brilliant and I am lucky to have them in my life.


Friends and work colleagues



My friends and work colleagues have been ace.  They are based all over the UK so their support and kindness has manifested itself in all sorts of ways.  They've sent me cards, flowers, messages, healing vibes from the chalice well in Glastonbury, gifts, kisses, given me hugs, lit candles, took me for meals and prayed for me.   


The chalice well, Glastonbury

I've also managed to meet up with friends from work, including a former work colleague who had breast cancer 11 years ago.  She's such an inspirational role model who never allowed cancer to get her down and didn't give a stuff about going out with her bald head.  

One of my former work colleagues also played me a tune on his radio show.  The song was 'Bananas' by a group called Man.  The first time I heard it was about 20-odd years ago when the same chap let me listen to it on his Walkman on the train into work.  I nearly wet myself 'cos I laughed so much at the words.  I still do whenever I hear it.


Social media



What has been a revelation is the reaction on social media. 

I was initially reluctant to tell people on Twitter and Facebook about my diagnosis.  Breast cancer seemed to me to be quite a private thing to go public about.  Then I thought that if I was open about it, people might not feel awkward engaging with me.  I wasn't ashamed or embarrassed about having cancer and I didn't want others to be either.  I also thought that it could be mutually beneficial to reach out to other people with cancer.  

I was a bit worried about being trolled but thought 'so what'.  I told myself if I did get trolled, I would deal with it.  The social media reaction has been totally amazing.  People (many of whom I've never actually met) have reached out to me, sent me many wonderful thoughts and messages and in some cases have privately shared their own personal experiences with me. 


Hockey family



People like me who love ice hockey, for example because they watch it, play it or officiate, often describe themselves as being part of the 'hockey family'.  

The support and kindness I've received from the hockey family has been fantastic.  I've had lovely messages from people connected to ice hockey and the Belfast Giants (my favourite ice hockey team) and fellow hockey fans.  Again, many people have shared their own personal experiences of cancer with me and I feel privileged to be part of that.


What I have learned



I have been deeply touched by everyone's incredible love, warmth and generosity.  The kindness of people has far surpassed anything that I could have ever expected or hoped for.  

Knowing that people are thinking of me as I go through this crappy journey feeds my soul.  It makes me appreciate that I'm not going through this experience on my own.  


What cancer has taught me so far however - and I know it sounds like a cliché - is that life really is too short to do anything other than treat each other with love, kindness and appreciation.  It can make all the difference to someone, especially if they are going through a tough time.  I know it has for me.

You are loved.

PS

Please feel free to leave a comment below, follow me on Twitter: @luvvacurry and/or subscribe to my blog.



5 comments:

  1. Hi, Karen - finally got round to reading your blog tonight! I kind of wish I'd written things down as I went along but it's a bit late now... You look equally stunning,by the way, with or without hair. I'm doing my own quiet rebellion - no more hair dye! Even my hairdresser thinks it'll look all right - guess the curls will help hide the regrowth. Keep writing and I'll keep reading! J x

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    1. Thank you Jo. Good for you about the hair dye! I'm not sure I could be that brave when my hair eventually does come back. I don't fancy having short, curly grey hair to be honest. Take care and fight the good fight xx

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  2. Hi, Karen - finally got round to reading your blog tonight! I kind of wish I'd written things down as I went along but it's a bit late now... You look equally stunning,by the way, with or without hair. I'm doing my own quiet rebellion - no more hair dye! Even my hairdresser thinks it'll look all right - guess the curls will help hide the regrowth. Keep writing and I'll keep reading! J x

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  3. Ahh you must know my lovely neighbour Steve Thornton 😉 Look if people didn't share what they were going through we wouldn't really know what it's like. Keep it up x

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    1. No I unfortunately don't know Steve Thornton although I have chatted with him after a couple of Giants games. Nice bloke! Thanks for reading my blog and all your kind words. Much appreciated. xx

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